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 PRE-ORDERs for FRACTURED GLASS are NOW available!!!

Fractured Glass is a YA Sci-Fi Novel Anthology unlike any other. It was written by 5 different authors who came together to give you 1 amazing story.

What if other worlds existed alongside your own? What if you could travel through them and truly escape reality?

Sloan and Harley Glass were born moments apart; but, despite their differences, the sixteen-year-old twins couldn’t be closer. They’ve held their tongues each and every time their mother has uprooted them—often moving across the country with little notice. They’ve learned to accept change. But what is Mom running from?

They discover they’re travelers—half-descendants of those who can traverse an entire universe of parallel worlds known as fractals. When the past catches up, Harley is kidnapped and taken to one of those distant worlds. Now, Sloan must garner her courage and find a way to rescue her sister. Traversing the worlds isn’t the hard part; it’s surviving the elements and the creatures lying in wait to destroy everything in their path.

Will the Glass sisters be able to save the fractal worlds from the kidnapper, or will everything fracture and crumble around them?

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Pre-Order Link

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 Find the authors Facebook pages here…

Jo Michaels ~ Tia Silverthorne Bach ~ Casey L. Bond ~ Kelly Risser ~ N.L. Greene

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Get to know Calix:

Calix is dark and sexy. He’s a product of cross-fractal species breeding, and no one knows his true age. But there’s one thing everyone does know: Diego is insanely jealous of Calix spending time with Sloan. Everyone wonders what it is the man is truly after, but he’s not talking, and he has possession of Sloan in the fractal universe.



Two Moons of SeraFrom Goodreads: Finally, the complete Two Moons of Sera novel in one edition! Read all four volumes in one collection.

In a world where water and earth teem with life, Serafay is an anomaly. The result of genetic experiments on her mother’s waterborne line Serafay will have to face the very people responsible to discover who she really is. But is she the only one?

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Two Moons of Sera—Omnibus, is the complete four part series all in one book. For me, it was like the element world met fantasy, complete with land dwellers–Erlanders, water dwellers–Sualwet, and even a fire dwellers–A’aihea. Segregated and at war with one another, Serafay knows little of any world. Half human and half Sualwet, and despised by both races, she’s lived her life in seclusion for her sixteen years. But today, everything she’s ever known is going to change.

This four part volume takes place over the course of about a week, beginning with Sera as she hems and haws about her mother not allowing her to go anywhere aside from their beach, however, a sighting of a strange Erlander piques her interest and is the beginning of the end of life as she knows it. Meeting Tor is a godsend in a way, because soon after, the war between Erlanders and Sualwet takes a turn for the worst, and Sera is forced to flee. Hand in hand with Tor, the strange Erlander she met on the beach, her adventures begin as they find themselves in many a precarious situation.

I loved learning about the different people of this world Tyler has created. The Erlanders are just like humans as we know them, living within the confines of cities, believing themselves superior, starting wars. But the difference here is the dystopian aspect—Erlanders are at the mercy of their government; they are matched with others, are given three chances to reproduce within their match, are assigned jobs, and are unable to make their own choices about basically everything. The Sulawet live underwater and are the equivalent to merfolk in my mind, but they also have the ability to walk on land. Their eyes and webbed feet give them away, and because land is foreign, most do not tread the ground often. They have their own distinct language, live in underwater cities, and disown/dislike any foreign object, people included. And the A’aihea are fire dwellers. The closest equivalent I was able to make in my mind was those who live near the equator. While the A’aihea people of Tyler’s story dwell in the mountains and deep underground, their lack of clothing due to heat, and their vast hatred of any and all foreigners, Erlander or Sulawet alike, made me think of a more tribal type of group.

Overall, the vast similarity between these groups is their hatred for any and all foreigners. And it is this was Tyler speaks about in her writing, though it’s more of a theme than a direct admonition of the world today.

I found the beginning of this novel to be a bit slow, but when Sera met Tor, the storyline began to pick up. As events unfolded, I found myself engrossed in the story, rooting for Sera and Tor and becoming quite protective of them as they found themselves on some fairly wild adventures with both Erlanders and A’aiheas alike. However, I must say that the very last volume left me wanting; there is minimal closure, and so I am sure that Tyler must be planning a sequel of sorts. While an epilogue does exist, it creates more questions than it answers, with the biggest of them all still left unanswered: what is Sera’s purpose the A’aihea spoke of? Overall, this is a great fantasy serial that I highly recommend, but know going in that this isn’t the whole story. Four stars.

4 stars

I received this novel from the author in exchange for an honest review.

Amazon Paperback | Kindle



Residual BelligerenceFrom Goodreads: The almost mythical Thieves’ Guild has no qualms about playing both sides of the line, manipulating and exploiting the ever-present rumblings of discontent between Earth and Winter. No one messes with the Thieves’ Guild. Except someone just did.

Zach Hilyer is in trouble. Taking a package from A to B always gets more complicated when A doesn’t want to lose it and C will pay and do anything to get their hands on it. Hil is good, one of the best field operatives in the guild. Problem is, he can’t remember when it all went wrong.

After crash landing on a planet with no memory of his last assignment, Hil discovers that his handler is dead and someone’s put a price on his head.
Injured and alone, he has no choice but to go rogue from the guild, fight to clear his name and wreak revenge on the people who set him up.

Blackmail, murder, betrayal and the highest bounty in history set the Thieves’ Guild at the center of a conflict that threatens to spark a galaxy-wide war.

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This is a great novel for fantasy and sci-fi buffs, especially if you like novels like Ender’s Game.  I’ve sort of pulled away from this genre lately as I’m finding my tastes are more for down to earth, relatable stories, but even so, this is a very well written novel!  Fast-paced, filled with action and mystery, it keeps readers focus as the plot unfolds, whisking them across the galaxy as the bounty hunters search for a fallen comrade and a mysterious package as our hero, Hil, tries desperately to remember the past and recover from his bout of amnesia.

The novel opens with action and it continues non-stop; reader and Hil alike don’t know who to trust, and it’s a great roller-coaster ride as the plot unfolds.  I highly recommend it to those looking for a galactic adventure.  Three and a half stars.

3.5 stars

I received this novel from the published in exchange for an honest review.

Kindle | Nook



12820228From Goodreads: Sammy’s life is a nightmare, and it’s all her fault. First, she is caught shoplifting-a big no-no in the hard-on-crime Dominion’s world-and is shipped to a prison-mine for women on a faraway desert planet. Then on her very first week there, she destroys a droid belonging to the prison… on purpose. So when she’s sent deep into the pit of the mine as punishment, Sammy doubts she’ll live to see her sixteenth birthday. After all, this is the diggers’ level, and they are the prison’s most violent criminals. To her surprise, she finds a new family in one of the digging crews. But she also makes a deadly enemy. Can she and her crew manage to escape the prison and regain their freedom?

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This was a completely different and unique book from the ones that I normally read, and I really liked it!  Not only is the plot intriguing, but the story itself is also very well written.  Though a bit long for my tastes, with a few too many characters for me to keep track of, this underground adventure in the mines kept my attention and offered many fantastical creatures and situations that I truly enjoyed. From droids to gun fights and massive explosions, this novel has something for readers of all ages, and if you enjoy great world building and epic battles, then this is a novel for you.

Though I wouldn’t say that Sammy is necessarily a kick-butt heroine, she’s down-to-earth, has a good heart, and is more than willing to pull her own weight, which makes her impossible not to love.  And I really enjoyed watching her bond with the ladies of her digging crew, backing each other up and ultimately saving each other on multiple occasions.  With other factions of prisoners underground all vying for more food, the gangs underground are all pretty cutthroat, and I loved this in-depth look at prison life in this sci-fi world, especially when it comes to a daring escape gone wrong…

Mallet has done a great job creating a world unlike any other that I’ve read about and, though she does have many characters, in the end I think they all play an important part and the story wouldn’t be possible without them.  If you’re looking for something different with a flare of science fiction and some intense fight scenes, then I highly suggest picking this one up.  Three and a half stars.

3.5 stars

I received this novel from the author in exchange for an honest review.



18054394From Goodreads: Space is not as endless as Humans thought. In fact, for our kind it all ends at Pluto where the elements of the Greater Drahgosian Empire keep watch to ensure no one leaves the reservation. We are free to explore our own system, to expand and colonize, but to look out beyond our system is forbidden.

Iago has a plan, and if it works he just might be the first human to walk under an alien star. All he needs is a hairless dog, a vindictive Commander, and a Drahgosian starship capable of breaching the vast distance between star systems. Picking up a beautiful alien female like Eema would just be bonus points.

But there is more going on with the reservation than Iago realizes, and his dream may very well be the death of all humanity.

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Those who really like Star Trek and other space intense movies/novels should definitely pick up The Starrunner.  Set in the distant future, this novel begins with the revelation that extraterrestrials have indeed made contact with earth, only to set a rule in place: do not explore outside earth’s solar system.  But why?  Iago, our main character, has spent many years wondering what exists beyond the solar boarders, and in his attempt to see more of the universe,  our story takes off.

Iago is somewhat of a trickster, intent on sticking it to the higher ups from the very beginning of this novel.  And, as the commanders and higher ups don’t take jokes and such very well, Iago soon finds himself in a predicament that could end with his death.  Always resourceful, though, he is able to use his circumstances to his advantage, breaking out of the confines and, indeed, seeing more of the universe, but at what cost?

As this novel unfolds, readers are introduced to many different alien species, many of which have very human characteristics in either looks or actions.  One in particular, Eema, a beautiful alien woman, is not what she seems upon first meeting, and I loved her kick-butt presence, illegal antics and all.  Although she is far from what Iago expected in his cross-universal search, they become companions more out of desperation than true friendship, and watching them banter and learn to work together was a lot of fun, as was learning the reason for the Drahgosian rule against human exploration of the universe.

Overall, I really liked the characterization, especially of Eema and Iago, and the story itself was very good, but it seemed to jump from scene to scene a little less fluidly that I would have liked.  There were times that I would have loved more intricate information about an alien people, or a circumstance Iago and Eema found themselves in, only to be whisked ahead a few months instead, which left me with a few questions here and there, but nothing too vast.  This is a very intriguing novel, and though I’m not really a space or scifi fan myself, as I said before, those who really enjoy Star Trek and other space movies and novels should definitely pick this up, because I think they’ll love it.  Three stars.

3 stars

I received this novel from the author in exchange for an honest review.

 



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